Athletes, Surgery and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Athletes, Surgery and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
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Categories:Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Epstein-Barr Virus, Uncategorized
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Athletes get injured.  It happens.

You do not have to be a professional athlete to suffer a devastating injury.  Some of these injuries land you, the athlete, in a hospital bed requiring a surgery to fix/repair what was injured.


I have been there.  36 major broken bones and 12 surgeries!  I know what it is like to be cut on, rehab and rebuild the body.


Injuries are a necessary evil for sport. 



What doesn’t have to be a necessary evil is developing chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) or Epstein Barr Virus (EBV).


Many athletes have an injury, go in for a surgery, begin training/competing and then notice their body isn’t the same.  


Fatigue is haunting them.


After seeing doctors, they are diagnosed with CFS or EBV.

Why does this happen?


I have seen a few common denominators in these athletes and they all revolve around their genetic mutations.

The following genes are commonly mutated in these athletes: NOS2, TRAF-1, GSTM1 and GSTP1.

Note the TRAF1 mutation. This mutation predisposes athletes to Epstein Barr Virus
Note the NOS2 mutation. This mutation predisposes athletes to exercise intolerance and fatigue.
Note the GSTM3 mutation. This mutation makes it difficult to detoxify chemicals from anesthesia.


What does this mean?  It means that these athletes were predisposed, genetically, to developing CFS, exercise intolerance and/or EBV.  

The GSTM1 and GSTM3 genes will impact how well an athlete is able to detoxify toxins, especially chemicals from anesthesia.

If your body can not detoxify chemicals properly, your immune system will take a hit. Your body will have a difficult time recovering. You will also be more susceptible to viral infections like Epstein Barr Virus.

I don’t find it a coincidence that the chronically fatigued athlete will develop CFS and/or EBV AFTER surgery.  


If you are struggling with CFS or EBV, contact me and let’s discuss if your genetics are holding you back from competing at the level you once did.

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